A personal reviewed on a quotation from the book “How Google Works”

Pamela Angeles
Friday, October 10, 2014.

A personal reviewed on a quotation from the book of Schmidt, E., Rosenberg, J., (2014). How Google Works.

I am subscribed to a monthly news letter from the author Annie Murphy, who wrote the book “Brilliant: The New Science of Smart”, she has a blog where she writes many interesting topics and send it to her readers. I received the article, “Making data useful”, where the author at the end of the essay, shares a very interesting quote from the authors, Schmidt, E., Rosenberg, J., (2014) writers of “How Google Works”.

“When we contrast the traditional knowledge worker with the talented people who surround us at Google, we see that our Google peers represent a quite different type of employee. They are not averse to taking risks. They don’t keep quiet when they disagree with something. They are multidimensional, usually combining technical depth with business savvy and creative flair. In other words, they are not knowledge workers, at least not in the traditional sense. They are a new kind of animal, a type we call a ‘smart creative,’ and they are the key to achieving success in the Internet Century. Their common characteristic is that they work hard and are willing to question the status quo and attack things differently. This is why they can have such an impact. It is also why they are uniquely difficult to manage, especially under old models, because no matter how hard you try, you can’t tell people like that how to think. If you can’t tell someone how to think, then you have to learn to manage the environment where they think. And make it a place where they want to come every day.”—Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg, How Google Works
When I read the quote, just right after, all those words made echoed on my mind, like if those words were also written for me. Suddenly, I identified myself with the type of people Schmidt and Rosenberg were talking about.

In the firs place, the fragment, “They don’t keep quiet when they disagree with something”. It reminded me when I have to phase situations like that at my work place. However, I know every worker person phases that kind of situations; nonetheless each one of us confronts the situations or not in a different matter. For example, there are some people who are brave enough like to point out to his or her boss when he or she is wrong at doing or saying something related to the workplace. Others prefer just disagree inside their minds, and keep their thoughts inside and just tell it to other coworkers or to their spouses and friends. In my case, almost a 90 percent of the time, I tend to say to my boss, “that’s not the way, it is this way, because of this and that…”, and as you may imagine, sometimes it is taken in account, and sometimes is not.

On the other hand, a piece of the quote I found really compelling says, “Their common characteristic is that they work hard and are willing to question the status quo and attack things differently. This is why they can have such an impact.” This particular fragment caused the most impact on me. As a woman from the “millennials” generation, I have get educated to some level that gives me a broader approach on work situations, I have learned a second language, I have gained a technical degree, I have gone to study in two different countries, besides of my homeland, and I have gained a BA, and al those studies have equipped me with different ways to see things and by a different prospective, basically in work related matters, and others too.

In order to gain those qualifications, a lot of hard work had to be done. Since I was a teenager, I worked hard in terms to earn knowledge and study in better places than the ones I had around me. I pushed my family with the idea that a “third world country” and a “poor student” could study in a foreign country. I did my best to gain a scholarship one time and then a second time; managed to study in the university while working, and toke extra classes on special courses. All that sense of becoming better, it was only accomplished by a great sense of hard work and devotion. So to me, the idea from Schmidt and Rosenberg, that “they are willing to question the status quo and attack things differently”, its all true to me.

To enhance that idea, first of all, the “kind of people” they talk about, are people whom are curious, like to investigate and demonstrate what they have found; besides those people, always effort themselves to gain knowledge and experiences in their subjects of expertise, they are studious people. Moreover, some of them may perhaps also have had the opportunity to go abroad and meet new cultures, either because of going to study with scholarships or going abroad for work experiences with other companies and colleagues.

In addition to that, it has being proved that people who have live abroad and get to assume both cultures, the home culture and host culture are call “bicultural” (American Friends of Tel Aviv University, 2012), those kind of people have gained particular ways of seen, analyze and proven things, they are describe as people that “showed more fluency, flexibility, novelty and innovation” (American Friends of Tel Aviv University, 2012). Another study which was conducted by Maddux,W., Galinsky, A., Tadmor, C., (2010) says “People who have international experience or identify with more than one nationality are better problem solvers and display more creativity”. So to speak, do we really represent a different kind of employees in our companies and institutions base on what we read?

On the other hand, Schmidt and Rosenberg definition says, “they are uniquely difficult to manage, especially under old models, because no matter how hard you try, you can’t tell people like that how to think. If you can’t tell someone how to think, then you have to learn to manage the environment where they think”. By not doubt, people who have spent time learning new things, investigating, reading a lot, being curious, learn from others on how they resolve problems in their environment, and questioning things to come up with different ideas and approaches, don’t you think they will be difficult or challenging to manage? That kind of people tend to see things as a whole and then dismember piece by piece, idea by idea, and thought by thought whatever another person will say. People like that, (like me and you), will not feel conform just by what the other person says, they will investigate and found out if it’s real or not what the person is expressing.

In conclusion, even despite the fact that the quotation on this critical review was generated in a book analyzed by the kind of people who work at Google, I think this kind on personality thinking does not only applies to people whom work there, it is also applicable to those many other people whom work in different companies, organizations (like me and you) and at jobs places that require great performances for achieving great goals.

What do you think; do you feel the analysis of Schmidt and Rosenberg about the people working at Google reveals or gives you a different prospective about the people who work on technology fields?

Do you think only those people working in companies like Google are outstanding and different thinkers?

Do you think am I too audacious like to analyze and think I am like one of those super “people” working at Google, or do you also think like me, and feel so identify with that type of personality?

Let me know your thoughts and ideas.

American Friends of Tel Aviv University. (2012, November 6). Living abroad can bring success, if you do it right. Science Daily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121106125610.htm

Maddux,W., Galinsky, A., Tadmor C. (2010). Be a Better Manager: Live Abroad. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from http://hbr.org/2010/09/be-a-better-manager-live-abroad

Millennials Retrieved October 20, 2014 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millennials

Murphy, A. (Thursday, October 2, 2014). Making data useful. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from http://anniemurphypaul.com/2014/10/making-student-data-useful/

Schmidt, E., Rosenberg, J., (2014). How Google Works. United Stated: Grand central Publishing. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from http://www.amazon.com/How-Google-Works-Eric-Schmidt/dp/1455582344#reader_1455582344

Third World Country . Retrieved October 20, 2014 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_World

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